In this talk, Christine Hartmann Siantar and Sarah Palmer will explain what cancer is all about and will describe exciting new research at Livermore Lab that uses radioisotopes tagged to cancer-seeking molecules to find and treat widespread cancer.

Today you will learn

  • To build an understanding of what cancer is
  • To understand how cancer affects our population
  • To understand that cancer progresses through stages
  • To introduce you to some of the new ways cancer therapy can be used to customize treatments and possibly increase survivorship

Goal

To introduce you to some of the new ways cancer therapy can be used to customize treatments and possibly increase survivorship.



Student Lecture Notes

To introduce you to some of the new ways cancer therapy can be used to customize treatments and possibly increase survivorship.


Student Lecture Notes

1.) How many people get cancer in the United States every year?

 

2.) What are the overall chances of getting cancer?

 

3.) What is metastasis?

 

4.) On the drawing below, describe what is going on at each arrow shown:

 

5.) What are two ways we can treat cancer?

a.

 

b.

 

6.) Why would it be helpful to be able to target cancer cells specifically?

 

7.) How can you image cancer?

 

 

Speaker Bios



Dr. Christine Hartmann Siantar

Dr. Christine Hartmann Siantar is the Director of the, Glenn T. Seaborg Institute, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She completed a B.S. in physics in 1985, from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She completed a M.S. in 1987 and Ph.D. in 1991 in Medical Physics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She completed a clinical physics residence program at the Milwaukee County Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Recently she was the Program Leader at LLNL for the PEREGRINE project, a new approach to planning radiation therapy using a highly accurate computer system for calculating where and how much radiation is absorbed in the body during radiation treatment for cancer and other diseases.


Dr. Hartmann Siantar has received numerous awards for her work in radiation physics including being named an Edward Teller Fellow in 2000, the R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 1996.



Dr. Sarah Palmer

Sarah Palmer is teacher Environmental Science and Technology for the Tri-Valley ROP (Regional Occupational Programs) at Foothill and Livermore High Schools. Dr. Sarah Palmer is currently teaching Environmental Science and Technology for the Tri-Valley ROP (Regional Occupational Programs) at Foothill and Livermore High Schools.

She holds a B.A. degree in Biology and Political Science from New York University and a Ph.D. in cell physiology and biochemistry from University of Toronto. In her career she has worked as a data technician at Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA and completed a post-doctoral research appointment at the Cancer Research Laboratory at UC Berkeley. Dr. Palmer worked as a Research and Development/Sales and Marketing liaison for a medical diagnostics firm, and taught biology, developmental biology, botany, zoology, ecology, immunology, physiology, and evolution at: UC Berkeley, CSU Hayward, Mills College, Holy Names College, and Las Positas College. She has also been a coordinator for the American Chemical Society's U. S. National Chemistry Olympiad for the past 5 years and help coordinate the Environmental Pathway for Foothill High School. Her hobbies are scuba diving and bicycling and her favorite job is being a mom.

Terms

Careers